tag: suricata

Malware on the Wire: Monitoring Network Traffic with Suricata and ClamAV

19 Jun, 2020 - 6 minutes
In my endless quest to essentially create a Cisco Firepower firewall for poor people, I found a bit of a gap in the open source security ecosystem. While we have great tools for detecting malicious network traffic patterns, we don’t have easy ways of detecting malicious files in transit. So, a bit of fiddling around later, and I have a fairly basic system for integrating Suricata’s ‘filestore’ functionality with ClamAV’s real time scanning, thereby producing a log containing the source and destination addresses of any malicious files detected.

Cloud Threat Protection with OSSEC and Suricata

19 May, 2020 - 11 minutes
The idea of this setup is to protect the Small Systems as well as we protect the Big Systems. This solution uses a proven stack to protect webservers from modern threats. Using OSSEC, Suricata, and the built-in firewall capabilities of a modern Linux system it is possible to build a low maintenance and stable threat protection platform with relatively low performance impacts. It’s been specifically designed to be simple. The idea is that it will keep you on a ‘need to know basis’ and otherwise stay quiet and do it’s job.

Being Attacked by Bots

18 Feb, 2020 - 6 minutes
On the 19th of January 2020, a malicious actor launched an attack against my home infrastructure. At 42 minutes after midnight a device located in Buenos Aires, Argentina began attacking my proxy server. For the next six minutes, approximately 150 malicious HTTP requests were made. Fortunately, every single one of these requests was met with a HTTP/400 response, that’s because I don’t use Apache Struts 2 which this bot was attempting to exploit.

Linux Firewall and IDS Appliance

14 Feb, 2020 - 10 minutes
Over the years, I’ve chewed through quite a few different routers, firewalls, even virtual appliances to connect my home network to the internet. Though most of these provided positive experiences, all of them had at least one point of friction, sometimes to the point of being a dealbreaker. PFSense is a great platform, but has terrible ethics. Sophos is proprietary and has an awful CLI. Untangle feels more like an ad than a product.